Bruce Jenner
It's now official. Bruce Jenner's attempt to gain fame through his effeminate show, "I am Cait," is a dud. Most people don’t want to watch it and many more don’t care about a man who dresses up like a woman and calls himself 'Caitlyn.'

His public relation outfit tried to build the suspense and high expectations. Almost all entertainment magazine and writers calls the reality show "very brave," "beautiful" and "powerful." However, it turned out to be a failure, a disappointment and a disgrace.

Despite an enormous publicity campaign that included a Diane Sawyer interview, a Vanity Fair cover and a lengthy appearance at the ESPY Awards, Jenner’s new E! reality series "I Am Cait" opened with an underwhelming 2.7 million same-day viewers.

It's definitely not what E! was expecting. And critics had a field day pouncing on the lowest of low in reality TV.

The lesbians, gays, transgender and bisexual (LGBT) community can spin whatever they want and praise the show for whatever it is worth now, but the bottomline is, only a few cared. Numbers will show that not that many are keen on tuning in to watch a former Olympian and Wheaties model act out his painfully stereotypical version of a woman.

Though many in the media are trying to build some momentum for the show by creating controversies here and there, including a feature of a crying Jenner because his family did not whole-heartedly support him, it does not change a number of facts.

Back when Jenner had his interview with Diane Sawyer, 17 million tuned in just because of curiosity. When he accepted the Arthur Ashe Award for Courage on ESPN, a record 8.5 million tuned in for him because they hoped that the award-giving body will change its mind at the last minute. From those numbers and the 2.7 million who tuned in for "I am Cait," critics can infer that Bruce Jenner is way more popular than Boy George.

Given the breathless coverage the run up to "I am Cait" was given, it's got to be disappointing for those expecting huge numbers and a new national conversation about "bravery" and "beauty." Instead, they got a big … MEH. That’s why they should’ve read their Pauline Kael, not the shortened mis-attribution, but what she actually did say about the 1972 election.

"I live in a rather special world," Kael said. "I only know one person who voted for Nixon. Where they are I don't know. They're outside my ken. But sometimes when I'm in a theater I can feel them."

The people pushing Bruce Jenner and "I am Cait," including Jenner himself, live in a rather special world. They're surrounded by people who share their crazy views of the world and biology. They’re not exactly the new Pauline Kaels, though. When they're in the theater, they don’t feel everyone at all, as the numbers for the premier of "I am Cait" can attest.