Supergirl
When CBS premiered "Supergirl" a few days ago, feminists were all over the place praising the show for portraying a woman who can throw punches as powerfully as Superman. They have been eager to see a female superhero in a TV lead. Superheroes are archetypes, and feminists believed that Supergirl (a.k.a. Kara Danvers, played by Melissa Benoist) embodies the feminist girl-power ideal. And unlike Halle Berry’s Catwoman or Rebecca Romijn’s Mystique, she isn’t an overt sex object. She’s plucky, bright, and down-to-earth (pun intended).

These feminists couldn't be more wrong as CBS network’s primetime show aims to drive a kryptonite dagger into their heart. And then, twist the blade.

It starts with the name: teenager Kara, the cousin of Superman, was sent to Earth to be a caregiver to him as an infant. Supergirl cares for children! It is, in fact, her only mission objective.

Although she insists her first name is pronounced like Car-Eh, her boss Cat Grant (played with Thatcher-esque snark by actress Calista Flockhart) pronounces it "Care-ah," as if to underline the caring, traditionally feminine nature of Supergirl.

Her costume is made by Winn (Jeremy Jordan), a co-worker at CatCo, a newspaper publishing company owned by Cat Grant. It quickly becomes obvious that Kara is a different kind of superhero. She rejects the skin-baring outfit of feminist icon Wonder Woman so beloved by feminist slut-walkers.

Kara wants modest and practical to fight crime and rescue victims! Her boots are flat heeled and her cape is bulletproof and fireproof. What more does a girl need?

But what grated the teeth of feminist radicals is that Superman made a very brief appearance in the pilot episode, greeting Kara when she arrived on Earth and dropping her off at the Danvers. His face was never shown, but there were numerous references to the Man of Steel throughout both that first installment and the second.

However, the latest promo confirms that the hero will be making a physical appearance again, probably to save the day.