Coca-Cola Ad
Do you know that everyday somebody is easily offended by everything and anything? In short, the "political correctness" culture is raising the children in United States and in Mexico to be a bunch of weaklings.

The latest victim of this uncontrollable lameness is an ad distributed by Coca-Cola Mexico where pretty, young white people do their holiday good deed by bringing bottles of soda to a remote village and build a wooden Christmas tree in the town square.

The "Open Your Heart" advertisement has been called anything but, as the self-righteous indigenous rights' groups said the campaign promoted colonialism rather than unity.

"This type of publicity is an act of discrimination and racism," Elvira Pablo, an indigenous lawyer, said at a press conference in Mexico City. "It is a comment on our type of life and an attempt to put a culture of consumerism in its place."

Seventy years ago, 18 year olds were storming the beaches of Normandy. Now 18 year olds need some lawyer to protect them from people calling them names.

After the ad was promoted on YouTube for about a week and then slammed by minorities on social media, Coca-cola pulled it out just to preserve some semblance of compromise. However, there are other versions that can be found online, one titled "The 'White Savior' Ad Coca-Cola Made Private."

"Our intention was never to be insensitive to or underestimate any indigenous group," a Coca-Cola spokesperson said in a statement to food news site Eater. "We have now removed the video and apologize to anyone who may have been offended."

Silent but for a perky soundtrack, the video shows peppy fair-skinned actors bringing bottles of Coke to the mixed people in Totontepec, a town in the southern state of Oaxaca. The ad ends with "#AbreTuCorazon" or "#OpenYourHeart."

Instead of filing for discrimination, the opponents of the ad could have used health reasons from banning the video. It could have gained more sympathizers, than pretending to be the guardian of false morality.

Mexico is one of the most obese nations on the planet and a top consumer of soda—although the nation's soda tax has seen some progress in reducing sales.