Mary Jane Watson
When news broke that Zendaya would likely be playing Mary Jane Watson in "Spider-Man: Homecoming," comic purists and supporters of original material were flabbergasted. Who is a Zendaya? Clearly, she hasn't done much acting in worthwhile films or television (Disney productions are, shall we say, just the worst).

But there were some people who thought that is a great idea, especially ones that dare to push the envelope about diversity and preconceived notions about not staying true to what fifty years of literature has depicted is an attractive trend. Instead of being excited about having a redhead, spunky, white, alpha woman as the characters was originally intended, the PC police wants otherwise.

Even "Guardians of the Galaxy" Director James Gunn took to both Twitter and Facebook to support Zendaya. In a lengthy Facebook post below, he explained exactly why Zendaya is the woman he wants to fill MJ's shoes, and he could not be more wrong.

"For me, if a character's primary attribute-the thing that makes them iconic-is the color of their skin, or their hair color, frankly, that character is shallow and sucks. For me, what makes MJ MJ is her alpha-female playfulness, and if the actress captures that, then she'll work. And, for the record, I think Zendaya even matches what I think of as MJ's primary physical characteristics-she's a tall, thin model-much more so than actresses have in the past.

Whatever the case, if we're going to continue to make movies based on the almost all white heroes and supporting characters from the comics of the last century, we're going to have to get used to them being more reflective of our diverse present world. Perhaps we can be open to the idea that, although someone may not initially match how we personally conceive a character, we can be-and often are-happily surprised."
Based on these statements, Gunn is still out of touch with the comic canon.

People who actually knew about "Guardians of the Galaxy" prior to the movie would have been equally irritated if he decided to change Gamora from green to orange. If staying true to the original character is so unimportant, why didn't he change her? Or change Drax to bright pink? Or Rocket into a Rhino? Or Groot into a sentient bucket?

What's the point of not casting red headed pale Mary Jane as the original material dictates? Why not make her a double amputee Syrian refugee?

Many are still amazed that these Gunn has not figured this whole superhero thing out yet. Comic collectors and Marvel followers just want a good screen translations of their favorite characters as they were portrayed in the literature when they were growing up.

Every time somebody try to do this sort of thing to accommodate their selfish political, it just screams that the movie outfit does not have a lot of respect for the source material. Mary Jane is a very important character in the Spider-Man story. To reduce her to little more than a chance for token diversity is pretty insulting.

It just seems that "adding diversity" to casting these days simply translates to any person of color or ethnic backround other than white. Everyone is stoked for a new Spider Man movie and hardcore fans are not racist to be upset that a beloved character they know and love it basically being completely changed and for no other reason than "let's cater to another ethnicity because it might encourage more diversity in sales!"

"Fantastic Four" showed everyone that nonsensical stunt casting for diversity's own sake doesn't make a better picture, doesn't sell more comics, nor should it be blindly celebrated just because it was an artistic choice someone made. cine