Dropcam
The reviews from users for Dropcam are in, and they don't look so good.

Wi-Fi camera company Dropcam sold to Google's Nest for US$ 555 million in June 2014.

In June 2015, Nest announced its first new product since Google acquired it for US$ 3.2 billion last year — a smart camera called the Nest Cam, the first real product integration between the two companies.

The new device was heralded as a big improvement over the previous version of Dropcam, promising higher resolution video, better night vision, improved audio capabilities, and a sleeker hardware and app design.

But users on Apple's App Store, where the Dropcam app has a 1 1/2 star rating, don't seem to be too crazy about the newest version of the app.

Most of the one-star ratings of Dropcam, which date back to August of this year, are complaints about the frequency with which the app crashes, making its recordings unreliable. The complaints largely aren't about the hardware itself, but about the perceived bugginess of the app.

"App is constantly not working," one user says. "We use this as a baby monitor and we're always unable to view the live feed because the app doesn't work, or the camera mysteriously disconnects. Despite the fact that the camera is on and connected to the network. Our camera sits less than 10ft from our wifi hub in the same room so it has nothing to do with signal strength either."

Other users echo sentiments about the app and Dropcam's video recording feature not working. "I've used three Dropcams in my businesses for over a year and have been very pleased with them," another user says. "It's been a nightmare though since Nest took over." At least half a dozen other users noted in one-star reviews of Dropcam's app that they think the product changed for the worse when Nest took over. "Dropcam isn't what it used to be," one user said.