Register To Vote
Last 27 September, many in the U.S. were surprised to see a barrage of advocacy materials thrown all over the media encouraging the public to vote. They know that is was the National Voter Registration Day, but they were not aware how the various sites will treat it.

Interestingly, it was hyped everywhere.

Internet giants Google, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Reddit, along with 4,000 other websites, all featured the same message.

Google's homepage used its doodle to promote the big day and debuted an easy-to-use tool for finding registration details. Facebook rolled out a post, pinned to the top of feeds, encouraging users to vote.

Twitter launched hashtag #iregistered, along with a custom emoji — an American flag-themed top hat with a brim that reads "2016." And Reddit’s political vertical is hosting an “Ask Me Anything” on how to register to vote.

Tumblr joined the push with a link directly to a voter registration page featured on the right side of its dashboard. Silicon Alley companies like AOL, Bitly, Foursquare and Kickstarter banded together through the hashtag #TechTurnsOut, reaching out in real life to New Yorkers in a concerted effort to increase voter registration.

Apps like DoorDash also joined in the effort, by delivering voter registration information straight to users' doorsteps, when it usually delivers meals. The delivery app is available in San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Denver.

It’s not every day that you see the Internet come together with the same message.

The movement started after 2008, when 6 million people couldn't vote because they were unaware of how to register, according to Matt Singer. He's the founder of National Voter Registration Day, which takes place the fourth Tuesday of September, and a proponent of a widespread web presence.

"We want everyone to celebrate," Singer said in an interview. "A lot of web platforms are known for having a young audience, like Tumblr, but ... I think everyone in America uses Google."

It’s the one thing both sides of the political aisle can agree on: Register to vote — and then, of course ... get out and vote!